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How to plan a wildlife friendly bonfire night

 

Here are our 5 simple tips to make sure that your bonfire night is wildlife friendly this year:

1. Keep fireworks away from trees and next boxes

Just like our pets, wild animals are not the biggest fans of fireworks. If you are setting off fireworks this bonfire night we recommend that you do it out in the open away from trees and nest boxes. In this way you can avoid disturbing birds that may be roosting in trees or using nestboxes as a safe place to sleep.

2. Build your bonfire on the day

Animals looking for a suitable place to spend the winter will likely find a pile of wood very attractive. It's best to build your bonfire on the day in a clear open space to avoid unintentionally inviting guests. If you do build it before the day, do a thorough check around the bottom of the bonfire before lighting it - and when you do light it start on one side only so that animals, such as hedgehogs, have a chance to escape out the other side.

3. Don't use all your old wood for the bonfire

Why not save some of that old wood for the insects and animals in your garden. Create a mini log pile in the corner of the garden with some of the wood intended for the bonfire and give wildlife some space this winter. You could even build an insect hotel!

4. Use the ash from the bonfire in your compost (sparingly)

Once your bonfire is well and truly out, the cold ash can be a useful addition to your compost or to rake over the vegetable garden. Ash will increase the alkalinity of your soil which can be good for some species - the Royal Horticultural Society has a lot of advice on how to use the ashes from your fire.

5. Don't have a bonfire!

Of course, the most wildlife friendly thing that you can do is to not have a bonfire - there are plenty of great community events across the country to attend and support a local cause. However, that doesn't mean that you can't do anything at home, we love Alan Titchmarsh's idea of building a decompostable guy from straw or dead leaves and a cotton t-shirt. Why not get creative and use old fruit or plants to make a guy to sit atop your compost heap or log pile?


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How to plan a wildlife friendly bonfire night

 

Here are our 5 simple tips to make sure that your bonfire night is wildlife friendly this year:

1. Keep fireworks away from trees and next boxes

Just like our pets, wild animals are not the biggest fans of fireworks. If you are setting off fireworks this bonfire night we recommend that you do it out in the open away from trees and nest boxes. In this way you can avoid disturbing birds that may be roosting in trees or using nestboxes as a safe place to sleep.

2. Build your bonfire on the day

Animals looking for a suitable place to spend the winter will likely find a pile of wood very attractive. It's best to build your bonfire on the day in a clear open space to avoid unintentionally inviting guests. If you do build it before the day, do a thorough check around the bottom of the bonfire before lighting it - and when you do light it start on one side only so that animals, such as hedgehogs, have a chance to escape out the other side.

3. Don't use all your old wood for the bonfire

Why not save some of that old wood for the insects and animals in your garden. Create a mini log pile in the corner of the garden with some of the wood intended for the bonfire and give wildlife some space this winter. You could even build an insect hotel!

4. Use the ash from the bonfire in your compost (sparingly)

Once your bonfire is well and truly out, the cold ash can be a useful addition to your compost or to rake over the vegetable garden. Ash will increase the alkalinity of your soil which can be good for some species - the Royal Horticultural Society has a lot of advice on how to use the ashes from your fire.

5. Don't have a bonfire!

Of course, the most wildlife friendly thing that you can do is to not have a bonfire - there are plenty of great community events across the country to attend and support a local cause. However, that doesn't mean that you can't do anything at home, we love Alan Titchmarsh's idea of building a decompostable guy from straw or dead leaves and a cotton t-shirt. Why not get creative and use old fruit or plants to make a guy to sit atop your compost heap or log pile?


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Post a Comment


Please sign in or create an account to post a comment
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