perfect for pollinators
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perfect for pollinators
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Go Native! 

Our wild plants are under threat ... do your bit by planting some native plants.

 

Make a hotel 

Using sticks and tying them in a bundle with string makes a cheap and effective insect habitat.

 

Tin can alley 

A tin can filled with soil and fixed to a balcony or wall makes a perfect mini-planter.

 

Create a Meadow 

Designate an area of your garden as a wildlife haven and plant a meadow.

 

Street Trees 

Protect street trees. Trees absorb pollution and are invaluable as wildlife homes and for food.

 

Plant a hedge 

Hedges are living fences providing a home and food for plants, insects, birds and mammals. A mixed species hedge is best.

 

Contain it! 

Don't have a garden! Nearly all plants (and even ponds) are suited to container growing. Great for wildlife!

 

Keep Trees 

Trees are good for you, the climate and wildlife.

 

Protect soil 

It can take 1000 years to produce 2.5 cm of soil. Soil is life. So don't leave it exposed. Protect it with bark, straw or leaves.

 

Up front 

Don't be tempted to pave over your front garden. Research shows even tiny gardens house over 700 species of insect.

 

Don't Dig! 

Well, not too often. Too much digging has a negative impact on soil health.

 

for Peat's sake! 

Don't use peat compost. It can take up to 10,000 years to form a layer of peat. Over 80% of UK peat bogs have been damaged or destroyed.

 

Plant climbers 

Climbing plants like ivy provide great nesting space for birds and food for insects.

 

Get creative! 

Old welly boots or shoes filled with soil also make effective and quirky planters.

 

Make a pond 

It need only be tiny to be super effective for wildlife.

 

Go Native! 

Our wild plants are under threat ... do your bit by planting some native plants.

 

Make a hotel 

Using sticks and tying them in a bundle with string makes a cheap and effective insect habitat.

 

Tin can alley 

A tin can filled with soil and fixed to a balcony or wall makes a perfect mini-planter.

 

Create a Meadow 

Designate an area of your garden as a wildlife haven and plant a meadow.

 

Street Trees 

Protect street trees. Trees absorb pollution and are invaluable as wildlife homes and for food.

 

Plant a hedge 

Hedges are living fences providing a home and food for plants, insects, birds and mammals. A mixed species hedge is best.

 

Contain it! 

Don't have a garden! Nearly all plants (and even ponds) are suited to container growing. Great for wildlife!

 

Keep Trees 

Trees are good for you, the climate and wildlife.

 

Protect soil 

It can take 1000 years to produce 2.5 cm of soil. Soil is life. So don't leave it exposed. Protect it with bark, straw or leaves.

 

Up front 

Don't be tempted to pave over your front garden. Research shows even tiny gardens house over 700 species of insect.

 

Don't Dig! 

Well, not too often. Too much digging has a negative impact on soil health.

 

for Peat's sake! 

Don't use peat compost. It can take up to 10,000 years to form a layer of peat. Over 80% of UK peat bogs have been damaged or destroyed.

 

Plant climbers 

Climbing plants like ivy provide great nesting space for birds and food for insects.

 

Get creative! 

Old welly boots or shoes filled with soil also make effective and quirky planters.

 

Make a pond 

It need only be tiny to be super effective for wildlife.