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A meadow for mum!

 

Let us set the scene:

It is a Spring day in Medieval Britain and people are returning to their childhood homes and churches to celebrate the halfway point of lent in the run up to Easter. Many of these people are domestic servants who have been given the day off to visit their mother. As they walk along rural pathways, some carry gifts such as simnel cake, while others, mainly the children, gather wild flowers and vegetation from the hedgerows.

This tradition of returning home for 'Mothering Sunday' had almost disappeared by the early 20th Century. However, the rise of  'Mother's Day' in the United States at this time, led to a revival of interest in Mothering Sunday traditions in the UK. Constance Adelaide Smith published 'The revival of Mothering Sunday' in 1921 under the pseudonym 'C. Penswick Smith' and the tradition began to gather momentum once more. 

Yet, this revival coincided with a shift in agricultural techniques, especially following the Second World War, and wildflower habitats and hedgerows began to disappear. In fact, 97% of wildflower habitats have now been lost. Today we are more used to buying a bouquet of flowers than picking our own collection for Mother's across the country.

Maybe it is time to start a new tradition! Why not give wildflower seeds as a gift that will not only bring a burst of colour to Mum's garden, window box or plant pot, but will also help to reverse this loss of wildflower habitats! Let's give future generations the chance to pick wildflowers once again and bring back meadows for Mum's everywhere!

 


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A meadow for mum!

 

Let us set the scene:

It is a Spring day in Medieval Britain and people are returning to their childhood homes and churches to celebrate the halfway point of lent in the run up to Easter. Many of these people are domestic servants who have been given the day off to visit their mother. As they walk along rural pathways, some carry gifts such as simnel cake, while others, mainly the children, gather wild flowers and vegetation from the hedgerows.

This tradition of returning home for 'Mothering Sunday' had almost disappeared by the early 20th Century. However, the rise of  'Mother's Day' in the United States at this time, led to a revival of interest in Mothering Sunday traditions in the UK. Constance Adelaide Smith published 'The revival of Mothering Sunday' in 1921 under the pseudonym 'C. Penswick Smith' and the tradition began to gather momentum once more. 

Yet, this revival coincided with a shift in agricultural techniques, especially following the Second World War, and wildflower habitats and hedgerows began to disappear. In fact, 97% of wildflower habitats have now been lost. Today we are more used to buying a bouquet of flowers than picking our own collection for Mother's across the country.

Maybe it is time to start a new tradition! Why not give wildflower seeds as a gift that will not only bring a burst of colour to Mum's garden, window box or plant pot, but will also help to reverse this loss of wildflower habitats! Let's give future generations the chance to pick wildflowers once again and bring back meadows for Mum's everywhere!

 


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