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Can you make a promise for pollinators?

 

“Metre by metre let people know, metre by metre let pollinators grow!”

This is the message from students at St Alban’s Primary School in Hampshire. Just like Seedball they have a simple goal, to get you growing more pollinator friendly plants!

As part of the Heritage Lottery funded Polli:Nation project, the students won a national competition with their Pollinator Promise campaign. Having improved their school grounds, they recruited friends and family to provide food and shelter for struggling pollinators.

You can watch their winning campaign video here:

Now, with the support of Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) and YOU, the students want to spread the campaign across the country!

Hive, the school’s pupil voice group explains, “in Hive, we all work as a team, helping pollinators and trying to make the world a better place. Bees aren’t just buzzy things - without them we wouldn’t have most of our fruit and vegetables. Together, we learn to sow seeds and find out about which plants are best for pollinators. We want people to join us and help give bees a fighting chance.”

The students are asking you to sign up and say, "I promise to help pollinating insects by setting aside a 1 x 1 metre area in my garden or school grounds. Alternatively, I will plant a pot or window box with pollinator friendly flowers."

“Polli Promise is about making small individual changes which add up to make a big collective difference to hungry and homeless pollinators.” Says Julie Newman, who is leading the Pollinator Promise campaign. “By working together, we can inspire others to bring about changes for both pollinators and people.”

We know that many of you #wildflowerwarriors have already designated spaces for pollinators in your gardens this year, so why not sign the promise here and let the students at St Alban’s Primary School know how many people care!


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Can you make a promise for pollinators?

 

“Metre by metre let people know, metre by metre let pollinators grow!”

This is the message from students at St Alban’s Primary School in Hampshire. Just like Seedball they have a simple goal, to get you growing more pollinator friendly plants!

As part of the Heritage Lottery funded Polli:Nation project, the students won a national competition with their Pollinator Promise campaign. Having improved their school grounds, they recruited friends and family to provide food and shelter for struggling pollinators.

You can watch their winning campaign video here:

Now, with the support of Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) and YOU, the students want to spread the campaign across the country!

Hive, the school’s pupil voice group explains, “in Hive, we all work as a team, helping pollinators and trying to make the world a better place. Bees aren’t just buzzy things - without them we wouldn’t have most of our fruit and vegetables. Together, we learn to sow seeds and find out about which plants are best for pollinators. We want people to join us and help give bees a fighting chance.”

The students are asking you to sign up and say, "I promise to help pollinating insects by setting aside a 1 x 1 metre area in my garden or school grounds. Alternatively, I will plant a pot or window box with pollinator friendly flowers."

“Polli Promise is about making small individual changes which add up to make a big collective difference to hungry and homeless pollinators.” Says Julie Newman, who is leading the Pollinator Promise campaign. “By working together, we can inspire others to bring about changes for both pollinators and people.”

We know that many of you #wildflowerwarriors have already designated spaces for pollinators in your gardens this year, so why not sign the promise here and let the students at St Alban’s Primary School know how many people care!


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Post a Comment


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